Ready, set, go with hand bookbinding

Completed Lynne Crocker’s wonderful Hand Bookbinding class at The Button Factory in Portsmouth a couple of weeks ago. So much fun! Never ever will I look at a book in the same way I did prior to this class. Now I see a whole new world in a single volume: paper grain, signatures, smooth and rounded spines, headcaps and headbands, board papers, mitred corners and more. Don’t you just love it? In class, we hand bound three different types of books: a single signature book with folded cover, an accordian book with paste paper cover (we made the paste paper), and an eight signature case-bound book. Beginning now and continuing through this winter I’ll continue the new body of work I began printing this summer (Seacoast Women), plus will begin combining monotypes, writing and hand bookbinding.


Hand Bookbinding

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments closed

The art and craft of being made by hand

Fair Isle Pillow Cover

September and the unofficial beginning of autumn is here! This is my favorite season. While I knit continuously throughout the year, autumn brings with it an extra yen for all things warm, cozy and made with love by hand.

Most every Wednesday between 10 a.m. and 12 Noon, including today, I can be found knitting at  Sit ‘n’ Stitch which takes place in the second floor conference room at the Portsmouth Public Library. I’m currently practicing Fair Isle knitting. Am making two pillow covers. This photo shows the square pillow cover which I’ve finished knitting, pinned and am ready to block. Front: Fair Isle pattern. Back: Basketweave stitch in dark heather. Now knitting second pillow cover which is rectangular and different yet complimentary to the first. Pattern is from The Very Easy Guide to Fair Isle Knitting by Lynne Watterson (Copyright 2012).

Perhaps one day I’ll design and knit one of my own Fair Isle inspired patterns. Who knows?

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments closed

Seacoast women of summer 2014

IMG_3582

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments closed

Fresh inspiration

IMG_3404Just returned home to Portsmouth from our long anticipated road trip to Canada’s Prince Edward Island. Absolutely fantastic! Our visit was everything we hoped it would be and so much more. We stayed in Charlottetown at the Elmwood Heritage Inn which is truly spectacular. Beyond Charlottetown, which has very much of a Portsmouth look and feel (we really did feel at home), there are charming villages, rolling green hills, freshly tilled red soil on beautiful farms, miles and miles of seacoast and beaches and ocean views, delicious freshly caught local seafood (PEI mussels really do taste best on the Island!), friendly and fun-loving people, lots of sheep and local yarn and woolens, Anne of Green Gables lore and legend galore, and lip smackingly yummy Gahan beer which is brewed in Charlottetown. Amazing! We were in PEI well before high season (July-August), so no traffic, no crowds, no lines, empty beaches. An easy drive from Portsmouth (we did it in two short days with an overnight in New Brunswick both to and from PEI). We will return. As always, it’s wonderful to travel and now wonderful to be back home.

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments closed

Spring is in the air

Everything will be better -1323

“Everything will be better when the little flowers bloom in the spring.” This is my Mom’s favorite refrain when times are difficult and life looks dark and bleak. Yes, indeed, it’s been a long, cold, snowy winter here in New England as well as in other parts of the country. “Everything will be better when the little flowers bloom in the spring” also is the title of one of the monotypes I printed this winter which I learned yesterday has been accepted into the New Hampshire Art Association’s 28th Annual Omer T. Lassonde Open Juried Exhibition. The juror for this show is Ron Crusan, Executive Director and Curator of Exhibitions and Collections at the Ogunquit Museum of American Art in Ogunquit, Maine. Come one, come all to the Opening Reception this Friday, April 4, 5-8 p.m. at the Robert Lincoln Levy Gallery, 136 State Street, in Portsmouth. It’s been a long winter, and spring is in the air!

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments closed

All You Need Is Love

IMG_3042

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments closed

Small Pleasures

Happy 2014! I hope you and yours are well this new year.

I’m energized these days. Doing quite a bit of framing, including Small Pleasures, 2013 (below), in anticipation of this year’s exhibits. Looking forward to drawing more, plein air and from the model. I also want to noodle around with watercolor again, having been inspired anew by the John Singer Sargent Watercolors exhibit at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. And, yes, am printing a new batch of monotypes.

Stay tuned.

Small Pleasures

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments closed

My Christmas wish

Here is my Christmas wish:

Let us each and every one of us contribute something to making this holiday season and 2014 vibrant, alive and joy-filled by printing, drawing, painting, throwing or handbuilding pottery, making collages, cooking, baking, knitting, crocheting, sewing, arranging flowers, making music, dancing, singing, performing, acting, creating, being spontaneous, letting our imaginations soar, mixing up some magic and, most of all …

… by doing our best to practice kindness, compassion and peace each and every day.

IMG_2984

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments closed

The art of farm to table

“A farm is a form of expression, a physical manifestation of the inner life of its farmers. The farm will reveal who you are, whether you like it or not. That’s art.”

-Kristen Kimball, The Dirty Life: A Memoir of Farming, Food and Love, p. ?

 

Our second year of Seacoast Eat Local Winter Farmers’ Market got off to a grand start yesterday at Wentworth Greenhouse in Rollinsford, New Hampshire. We’ve been shopping at farmers’ markets for 20+ years, so I thought I knew a tiny bit about farming. Not true. I recently finished reading Kristen Kimball’s book A Dirty Life: A Memoir of Farming, Food and Love which my longtime friend Connie, who grew up on a farm in Pennsylvania, loved and passed along to me. I realize I actually knew nothing about farming prior to reading this book. Winter Farmers’ Market yesterday was a totally different experience than Winter Farmers’ Market this time last year. Same world. New way of seeing.

 

Winter Farmers' Market

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments closed

Morning pages

I’ve been writing Morning Pages for more than six years, having been inspired to do so by reading Natalie Goldberg’s Writing Down the Bones: Freeing the Writer Within. When I began making monotypes in 2000, I put my writing on the back burner. In 2007, I returned to writing via Morning Pages.

At first, I wrote Morning Pages maybe one day each week. Little by little, however, my writing practice increased. I’ve been writing Morning Pages more often than not each weekday morning for about three years now.

How do I write Morning Pages? I flip open my trusty Mead top spiral college ruled notebook; dig into my bag for a Pilot G-2 07 pen (always blue ink with a Fine point); and put pen to paper. First, I write the day of the week (Thursday) and the date (10.24.13) then skip one  line and write the name of the cafe where I’m writing and the name of the street where the cafe is located (Kaffee Vonsolln, Daniel Street). I don’t know why I begin writing Morning Pages this way; I just do. Then I simply write, write, write until I’ve filled three pages. I write anything and everything. It takes me one hour to write my Morning Pages.

When I began writing Morning Pages, it felt a bit labored. As time went on, I got more and more into the flow of writing Morning Pages. I enjoy feeling the pen glide across the paper, transforming each notebook page from a smooth surface into a tactile surface, textured by my very own handwriting. It’s a good habit to have, I think.

 

Morning Pages at Kaffee Vonsolln

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments closed